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Video: Safety Tips for Hunters Heading Out for the Minnesota Deer Opener

Nov 08, 2019 04:49AM ● By Editor

Photo:  WDIO-TV


By Chelsie Brown from WDIO-TV - November 7, 2019


Planning your hunt and understanding the hunting regulations in your zone are the easiest ways to avoid any problems or hunting violations when heading out into the woods.

"Know where you’re at, know where you’re shooting, know what’s behind what you’re shooting and be safe," recommended Brad Trevena the Region 3 Director of the Minnesota Deer Hunters Association.

Many regulations change from year to year, so it’s important to keep up with those changes by reading the Minnesota Hunting and Trapping Regulations Handbook.

"Now it is legal to use a dog for tracking. There are limits on when and where you can use your dog and lengths of the leash," he added.

Trevena has been an active member of the Minnesota Deer Hunters Association for 18 years. He says the most common violations conservation officers deal with is trespassing and not knowing how to properly tag a deer. With the opener on November 9, Trevena described the proper way to tag a deer.

"Go to this side (left) of the tag cut out nine," he explained while holding a deer tag. "Then you go back over to this side (right) of the tag and cut out November. If you shoot it in the morning, cut out AM if you shoot it in the evening cut out PM," he explained.

Once it’s filled out, the tag can be attached to the antler, the leg, or even the ear of the animal. All tags must be kept on the hunters at all times. Trevena also explained that the most gun accidents occur when climbing up and down from a tree stand with a loaded gun.

"Don’t load your gun until you are in your tree stand if you’re hunting from a tree stand," he reiterated.

For those who do plan on hunting in a tree stand he recommends wearing a harness.

"They’re not expensive. You can get into a good quality deer harness or safety harness for under 100 dollars," said Trevena.

He added a hunter’s life is worth more than 100 dollars.

Watch the WDIO-TV Report on hunter safety here

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